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Chinese Braised Spareribs with Daikon Recipe 蘿蔔焖排骨

Tuesday, April 26, 2011 | Labels: , |

What I love about braised dishes is that more often than not, these dishes are also one-pot dishes. The cooking method used also allows for less time at the stove since after preparing the necessary ingredients and adding the seasoning, the dish is allowed to simmer slowly on its' own. Note though that you should check on the dish occasionally just in case. Today's dish is inspired by the classic Cantonese braised beef brisket with daikon - the method I used is mostly similar except that I did not add star anise and I did not use 'chee hou' sauce - I skipped the star anise as I am not fond of the scent and since I was using spareribs which is a little milder than beef, I wanted to keep the flavours clean. A 'secret' ingredient most Chinese households add into braised meat dishes is rock sugar as the latter creates a tenderising effect for the meat. If you can't find rock sugar, substitute with some brown sugar.

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For my seasoning, I like to use dark soy sauce or 老抽 which is just soy sauce that has been fermented for much longer hence it has a deeper flavour. When I saw the lovely organic daikon in the local grocery store, I could not wait to make this easy dish. For some added fragrance, I also threw in a tiny bit of mirin for a slight sweetness that complemented the Shaoxing wine quite well. Of course, the other important elements for this simple dish are the aromatic ginger, scallions and black garlic. For almost all my Chinese cooking, I prefer to use black or smoked garlic as it provides deeper and more aromatic flavours. Do give it a try if you can find some.

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Serving suggestion: Steamed rice or Chinese noodles

Ingredients:

3 medium-sized daikon/ radish - skin scraped off and sliced to approximately 1 inch wide discs
4 cloves smashed garlic
1/2 red or yellow onion, quartered
2 stalks green onions/ scallions - smash the white parts lightly and save the green for garnish (sliced angularly)
8 slices young ginger, slightly smashed
1/2 pound worth of spareribs, rinsed and drained
Water for blanching spareribs to remove impurities
Cooking oil

Seasoning:

3 tbsps dark soy sauce
2 tbsp light soy sauce or to taste
1/4 cup Shaoxing wine or substitute with sake
1 tbsp mirin
1 small lump of rock sugar or 1/2 tsp brown sugar (or to taste)
2 cups chicken broth (canned or homemade)

1 tsp corn starch mixed with 1 tbsp water (optional)

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Method:

Firstly, prepare a pot of boiling water to blanch the spareribs.  Once boiling, place ribs into the water and remove once the surface of the meat turns white.  Drain and set aside.  Discard the pot of water. Clean pot.

Prepare the seasoning above by mixing all the ingredients above in a bowl except the wine and do a taste test.  Add more soy sauce or sugar if desired. 

Heat about 1 tbsp of cooking oil in a deep pan or claypot and once hot, turn heat to medium and add garlic, ginger slices, scallions and onions.  Stir-fry till aromatic. Add in spare ribs and stir-fry around for a bit.  Add the Shaoxing wine.  Add in the daikon slices. 

Pour in the seasoning and bring to a boil.  Cover and let simmer for about 45 minutes, checking occasionally.  If you think the daikon is not soft enough yet, simmer for a little bit longer.  It is alright to 'overcook' braised dishes as for these dishes, the longer the meat sits in the liquid, the more flavourful it gets.  If you prefer a thicker sauce, add a tsp of corn starch mixed with 1 tsbp water after the simmering is done.

Dish out and garnish with green onions (optional).  Serve hot with rice or noodles.

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14 comments:

Nami @ Just One Cookbook said...

Hello Jen! Nice to meet you. I forgot how I found your site (I must click somewhere when there was your link) and I tried to see the trail but I just couldn't find how I stumble upon your site.

But it's fate... When I was trying to look for my website name, I came across your website name somewhere (maybe foodgawker or tastespotting?). I really loved the name because that's something I really relate - taste and home. So I remember your website! Now I have a blog, and I came to your site, almost by accident. I felt so weird as if I was supposed to come find you today. Your pictures are amazing and I enjoy reading your recipes. You have so many repertoire that I will be learning a lot from you! Nice to meet you.

Nami @ Just One Cookbook said...

Hello Jen! Nice to meet you. I forgot how I found your site (I must click somewhere when there was your link) and I tried to see the trail but I just couldn't find how I stumble upon your site.

But it's fate... When I was trying to look for my website name, I came across your website name somewhere (maybe foodgawker or tastespotting?). I really loved the name because that's something I really relate - taste and home. So I remember your website! Now I have a blog, and I came to your site, almost by accident. I felt so weird as if I was supposed to come find you today. Your pictures are amazing and I enjoy reading your recipes. You have so many repertoire that I will be learning a lot from you! Nice to meet you.

Tastes of Home (Jen) said...

Hi Nami! nice to meet you too. Thanks very much for your extremely kind words and congrats on your blog! I'm really glad you like my recipes and glad we 'met'!

Three-Cookies said...

In your photo - is that black garlic? I have never heard of this before. Garlic looks a bit like that as it gets old but I think black garlic is not the same as old garlic!

TasteHongKong said...

Using 柱候sauce for braising daikon with meat is quite a common practice in my place. But I also love to cook them with soy sauce and rock sugar not only because they are often available in my cabinet, but also they make a delicious dish too.

Tastes of Home (Jen) said...

Hi, yes that is, but it's not black entirely, the black is uneven most of the time and yes it's not old garlic! You may be able to find black/ smoked garlic in Asian stores :)

Tastes of Home (Jen) said...

Yes, it is! I prefer soy sauce with pork instead of the 'chee hou' sauce but both are delicious :D

My Little Space said...

I wonder if it tastes the same when cooking with chicken meat! Cause NO pig in the house! haha...
Have a lovely evening.
Kristy

Cooking gallery said...

This looks like a very comforting home meal! Love how simple the recipe sounds!

Pudding Pie Lane said...

I do wish I rock sugar was more easily available in normal supermarkets, I use it for cooking whenever I'm in China and it's such a nice addition. Could I add coriander next time to finish the dish instead?

EmandM said...

Mmm this makes me miss my mom's cooking, I've definitely got to try this!

Cheah said...

I don't like the smell of daikon but I certainly don't mind the spare ribs. I like to braise pork belly, pork ribs too ... easy way out!

My Little Space said...

I wonder if it tastes the same when cooking with chicken meat! Cause NO pig in the house! haha...
Have a lovely evening.
Kristy

Min {Honest Vanilla} said...

Perfect I was just contemplating what to do with the daikon! :)))
I love braised dishes and this couldn't be more perfect!

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