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Showing posts with label Asian Recipes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Asian Recipes. Show all posts

Chinese Celery and Pork Stir-fry 芹菜炒肉片

Tuesday, December 20, 2011 | Labels: , , , , , , | 6 Comments »

A simple Chinese style stir-fry is a great way to have a balanced dish of protein and vegetables I always say. I have not been making 'elaborate' dishes lately and a good stir-fry served with some rice makes for a quick and satisfying meal for me anytime. 芹菜 (qin chai) or simply known as celery is as you can gather, a species of vegetables found mainly in Asia belonging to the celery family and although it has a much deeper green colour and is leafy, the taste and texture are quite reminiscent of the western celery. If you like celery, I am pretty sure you will like these popular stir-fry vegetables as well. These nutritious and toothsome vegetables are usually cooked with pork and perhaps a few slices of dried tofu but as I ran out of dried tofu today, I just stuck to the pork. Using a Chinese wok will also help bring this easy stir-fry to another level, the elusive wok breath really helps a lot.



Chinese Celery and Pork Stir-fry


I am sure that you must be busy rushing around with the holiday season upon us so I hope you'll find this easy stir-fry a good idea on one of those busy nights when you still feel like having something whipped up at home.  This is a very basic stir-fry recipe from my mom that will work with a ton of other vegetables as well.  If you don't like pork, you can also try substituting the pork with chicken or shrimp.

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Singapore Stir-fried Rice Noodles 星洲炒米

Thursday, November 03, 2011 | Labels: , , , , , | 9 Comments »

Today's feature is the famous Singapore stir-fried rice noodles - this appetizing noodle dish combines spicy, savoury, tangy and slightly sweet flavours in a neat little dish and is also incredibly easy to whip up at home but do note that there are quite a few ingredients needed for the sauce. Singapore fried noodles are usually stir-fried with Chinese BBQ pork, shrimp and beansprouts although of course you can be creative and come up with your own combination, having said that I think that the Chinese BBQ Pork (Char Siew) adds to the slight sweetness of the dish and really personifies Singapore stir-fried noodles. For today's post though, I cheated and used a ready-to-cook sauce and for those of you without access to sauces, I included my recipe to recreate this easy noodle dish at home below. Whenever I use ready-to-cook sauces, I cannot resist adding my own little accents and for today, it was no different.

Singapore Stir-fried Rice Noodles 星洲炒米

To kick up the heat factor a notch, I added chili and curry paste and some bird's eye chili peppers. I find that using soy sauce makes for a more flavourful dish as well and for tanginess, I added some ketchup and chili sauce. What I like about most good ready-to-cook sauces is that they give you a good base to expand on and allow you to put in your own little signature touches with lesser work in the kitchen. At the final step, I added eggs into the noodles as that's how I like my Singapore noodles but alternatively, you can serve the noodles with some shredded omelet.

Serves 4

Ingredients:

200g rice noodles or meehoon/ bihun

1 cup of diced Chinese BBQ Pork
2 garlic cloves, sliced or roughly chopped
1 small onion, sliced
1 cup of beansprouts
1-2 bird's eye chili peppers, sliced (optional)
1 bottle of Singapore Noodle Sauce* + 1/4 cup water
2 tbsps light soy sauce, add more if required
1 tbsp curry powder, mixed with 3 tbsps water
1 tbsp chili powder mixed with 3 tbsps water
1 tbsp chili sauce
1 tsp sugar
Cooking oil, about 4 tbsps used separately
1 stalk green onion, sliced for garnish (optional)
2 eggs

*Alternate sauce recipe (Mix the ingredients below together)

4 tbsps curry powder
1 tbsp chili powder
2 tbsps chili sauce
1 tbsp ketchup
1 tsp turmeric powder
3 cloves garlic, minced
4 tbsps light soy sauce (or add more to taste)
1 tsp sugar
1 tbsp cooking oil
1 cup chicken broth (or use chicken cubes mixed with water if easier)

Method:

Firstly, soak the rice noodles in warm water for at least 30 minutes to soften. Once the noodles have softened, drain and set aside.

Heat your wok until almost smoking. Add 2 tbsps of oil. Turn heat to medium and add the diced BBQ pork. Fry until lightly browned, dish out and set aside.

Clean your wok briefly. Heat wok again until almost smoking and add another 2 tbsps of cooking oil. Add onions, chili pepper slices and garlic. Turn heat to low and stir-fry until aromatic. Pour in the sauce (either World Food's or the alternative I offered) and bring to a boil.

Once the sauce is boiling, add in the rice noodles and allow the noodles to soak up the sauce for about 30 seconds, then add in the beansprouts. Once the liquid is almost completely gone, add in the diced BBQ pork and mix well with either a pair of chopsticks or tongs - it's better not to use a spatula to minimise breakage of the noodles. You should do a taste test at this point and add more soy sauce if required. As you are frying the noodles, if it looks a little too dry, go ahead and add a bit of oil from the sides of the wok which will also make for easier stir-frying as you go along.

When you are satisfied with the flavour of the noodles, crack the eggs into the noodles and stir into the noodles well. Dish out and garnish with some green onion slices if desired.

Singapore Stir-fried Rice Noodles 星洲炒米

Notes:

If you like, you can add some small shrimp as well. Dried tofu slices are also another popular addition. These noodles can also be served with a squirt of fresh lime juice (usually done at the table right before eating).

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Deepfried Nam Yue Chicken Wings Recipe 南乳雞翼

Sunday, August 31, 2008 | Labels: , , , | 3 Comments »

Everyone loves chicken wings right? I have featured chicken wings before but this time these chicken wings were marinated in red fermented beancurd (Nam Yue- 南乳). The latter is quite pungent and is a cousin of the other plain fermented beancurd or Fu Yue (in Cantonese). See my Kangkung with Fu Yue. Due to Nam Yue's distinctly pungent flavour, you will either love it or hate it but do give it a try. Think of Nam Yue as a much stronger version of miso or as some red Chinese cheese. These chicken wings can be served on its' own as a snack or served as a dish with some rice. I included some pictures of the Nam Yue for reference purposes. With chicken wings, as long as you have a decent marinade, it's pretty hard to mess them up! Oh, and of course you have to make sure they are cooked throughly as well....

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Sake Chicken Wings Recipe

Friday, June 06, 2008 | Labels: , , , , | No Comment »

Simple and easy recipe for lazy days - you can substitute the chicken wings with chicken drummettes or drumsticks. It's a little puzzling that as a person who does not like drinking alcohol, I do love to cook with spirits - right now, I'm in a sake phase so let me introduce my Sake Chicken Wings. The wings are simply marinated in my sake mixture and baked for about 15 minutes at 380 degrees F until there's a slight crispiness on the skin.

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Ingredients:

1 dozen chicken wings
4 tbsps sake (adjust as necessary)
4 tbsps mirin
1-2 tbsp sugar
2 tbsp dark soy sauce
4 tbsps light soy sauce
3 thick slices of ginger
6 cloves garlic, smashed
2 stalks green onions
Sesame seeds (optional, for garnish)

Method:

Simply mix the ingredients above except for the wings in a bowl. Place the wings in the bowl and let it marinade as long as possible, preferably more than 4 hours. Baked in oven for about 15 minutes or until cooked. Garnish with some toasted sesame seeds.


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Asian Neopolitan Marble Cake

Saturday, March 29, 2008 | Labels: , , , | 9 Comments »

As I don't really have a sweet tooth (fortunately!), I prefer plain cakes without heavy icing or cream although those do look very pretty! Since the weekend is coming, I decided to bake marble cake that goes really good with coffee or tea. I love to dunk the cake into coffee - anyhow, this is a simple recipe I adapted from my mom. Usually marble cakes have 2 colours, one being the plain butter part and the other being the dark cocoa part. However, I decided to use milo powder instead and added a third colour with food colouring. Makes a very pretty swirly cake! As I used red food colouring for my third colour, my dear friend commented that the finished cake looked almost like Neopolitan ice-cream, hence I decided to name my cake the Neopolitan Marble Cake..haha.

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Ingredients:

3 eggs
1 1/2 cups cake flour (sifted)
1/3 cup milk
1 stick butter, softened (I used salted)
2 tbsp milo or cocoa powder (mixed with 2 tbsp hot water)
1 tsp vanilla essence
3/4 cup sugar

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Don't forget to twirl the mixture with a fork to create the pretty swirly effect!

Method:

Firstly, pre-heat the oven to 350 F. Prepare a 9 inch round pan by greasing the pan and placing a piece of parchment paper at the bottom of the pan. Now, cream the butter and the sugar together until light and fluffy. Next, add in the vanilla essence and mix well. Crack the eggs into the mixture one by one, mixing after each one. Add half of the sifted flour and half of the milk into the mixture, making sure to mix well after each addition. Continue doing so until you have mixed in all the flour and milk. Next, divide the batter into 3 portions. Leave one plain, add the milo powder or cocoa powder to the second one and finally add some food colouring of your choice to the third portion. You can always just opt to have the 2 colours in your cake or if you're in the mood for plain butter cake, just place the mixture into the pan after mixing well without dividing into the 3 portions. Place the pan in the middle rack of the oven and bake for about 40-45 minutes. Check with a toothpick inserted into the middle to see if the cake is cooked, the toothpick should come out dry once cake is fully cooked.

Of course, if you're in the mood for icing, this is a great basic cake for dressing up as you please!

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Click here for my colourful Neopolitan Marble Cake Recipe

Chinese Steamed Copper Rockfish 清蒸石斑魚

Tuesday, March 25, 2008 | Labels: , , , , , | No Comment »

I have featured steamed fish before, but I just could not resist posting this steamed copper rock fish. This time, I'm steaming it whole and I am giving the ginger slivers a quick fry before pouring it on top of the fish. Most Chinese love steamed fish, and it's considered one of the healthiest ways to eat fish.

I just love fish and I'm so lucky to have such fresh fish. I have to say too that. Anyways, back to the fish - we devoured the entire fish save its' eyes though my dad would have done so had he been here. The flesh of the cheeks were extremely succulent and was really to die for!

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Ingredients:

1 medium sized rockfish
Green onions, finely chopped lengthwise
Ginger, finely chopped (I used a peeler to peel off thin strips of ginger then chopped it up)
Cilantro
Water for boiling

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I steamed my fish in a bamboo steamer placed on top of my wok.

For the sauce:

2 tbsp of oil
2 tbsp of light soy sauce
Dash of dark soy sauce
1 tsp of sugar
2 tbsp of water

Method:

Firstly, clean and scale the fish throughly. If the fish that you are using is relatively large, cut it down the middle for easier steaming. Place a stalk of green onion and two big slices of ginger on top of the fish and steam for about 15-20 minutes, depending on the size of fish used. Do not overcook the fish as the fish will continue to 'cook' even when it is out of the wok.

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Now, prepare the sauce by heating up the oil first. Once the oil is extremely hot, turn the heat to low - now mix the rest of the ingredients for the sauce in a separate bowl and pour into the hot oil, taking care to use low heat as the water will cause the oil to splatter. Now, remove the fish from the original dish it was steamed in, discard the stalk of green onion and ginger slices. Place the cooked fish into a serving dish, pile the green onions and ginger slices (give the ginger slivers a quick fry in hot oil) on top of the fish and pour the sauce all over the fish. Serve hot.

Tip: If you're using the bamboo steamer, be sure not to fill the wok right up to the top with water - the water will boil over and you will end up with boiled fish not steamed fish!

Please click here for other fish recipes of mine!


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Cold Soba (Buckwheat) Noodles

Tuesday, March 25, 2008 | Labels: , , , , | No Comment »

Zaru Soba

Summer is coming! In fact, it was pretty warm over the weekend in San Diego even for me who shivers easily. These noodles are the perfect summery noodles - Japanese summers can be pretty hot so these are perfect for a light and refreshing meal. I saved the additional soy-bonito sauce from my fish cheeks recipe Click here for sauce recipe from earlier and used it as the dipping sauce for the noodles. Soba noodles are native to Japan and are made of buckwheat flour and wheat flour. I used buckwheat noodles this time and I used the dried version - they are tastier though when made fresh. You can serve this with tempura i.e tenzaru soba.

Click here for an introduction to the popular noodles

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Ingredients:

Soba noodles
Toasted nori seaweed
Sesame Seeds
Scallions, chopped finely
Wasabi
Quail egg (optional)

Method:

Prepare a full pot of water - about 4 cups for 1 bundle of noodles. Once the water boils, put the noodles into the pot. Add cold water after the noodles are in the pot for about 2 minutes. Once the water boils again, add more cold water. Cook until al dente. Drain the noodles and rinse with cold water to remove all starch.

Sprinkle the sesame seeds and toasted nori seaweed strips on top of the noodles. Serve with dipping sauce. The wasabi, scallions and egg may be mixed into the dipping sauce.


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Japanese Clam Soup

Sunday, March 23, 2008 | Labels: , , , , | No Comment »

Hamaguri ushio-jiru

This is another recipe I took from Practical Japanese Cooking. Clams or hamaguri also known as beach chestnuts makes a light yet rich broth. This is a very flavourful and soothing broth. Make sure that the clams barely crack open before serving immediately. This soup differs from Cantonese soups where the latter is usually richly flavourful. Although the Japanese are famous for miso soup, I find that I prefer the broth-based soups in Japanese cooking. Cantonese soups usually take a few hours for boiling to produce the rich flavours, in contrast this soup only requires a few minutes of boiling. However, note that the clams will need soaking for 4-5 hours to bring out the sand and the seaweed has to be soaked and parboiled before boiling.

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For a spicier way to cook Manila clams, try my Stir-fried Manila Clams in Spicy Black Bean Sauce recipe.

Ingredients:

12 live hard-shell clams (I used Manila clams)
10g dried wakame seaweed
1 bunch enoki mushrooms
1 1/2 cups of water
1 1/2 cups bonito stock (dashi)
2 inch length kelp (konbu)
pinch salt
dash light soy sauce
dash sake
2-inch piece fresh ginger, finely slivered
1 piece cheesecloth or alternatively coffee filters for clarifying the broth

Method:

Preparation: Choose fresh clams that close tightly when touched. Avoid ones with cracked or chipped shells. Let the clams stand in salted water (1tsp salt to 3 cups water) in a cool, dark place for 4-5 hours to draw out the sand.

Prepare the wakame seaweed - soak for 20 minutes, next boil in pot until colour brightens. Drain and soak in cold water immediately.

Cut away the root cluster at the base of the enoki mushrooms. Parboil in lightly salted water, then plunge into cold water. Drain. Do not boil the mushrooms for too long as they soften quite quickly.

To make: Combine the clams, water, bonito sock and konbu kelp in a soup pot over high heat. Just before hte water boils, remove the kelp. Bring the mixture to a boil. When the clams open, remove from the pot and discard any that do not open. Strain the broth to clarify either with a cheesecloth or coffee filters. This will take a while - patience is a virtue here!

Return the broth to the pot and season to taste with salt, soy sauce, and sake. Reheat the mushrooms and wakame seaweed in the broth. Finally, divide the clams, mushrooms and wakame seaweed among 4 bowls. Add the broth, top with the slivered ginger and serve.

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Special crispy fried chicken

Tuesday, March 18, 2008 | Labels: , , | No Comment »

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPhoto Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Ingredients:

Chicken thighs - 4 pieces
Ginger juice (2 tbsp)
Green onion juice (2 tbsp)
Chinese five spice powder (1 tsp)
Corn flour/ starch - enough to cover the surfaces of the chicken pieces
Soy sauce (2 tsp)
Shao Tsing Wine (1 tsp)
Salt (1 tsp)
Dash of sesame oil
Oil for deep-frying

Method:

Firstly, I marinated the chicken with the ginger juice, green onion juice, five spice powder, soy sauce, wine, corn flour, salt and sesame oil for over 1 hour. Try to marinate as long as you can/ want. Heat up the oil in a wok until hot. Now, adjust the heat till about low heat and put in the chicken thighs to fry for about 20 minutes. Finally, you should turn up the heat and fry for another 10-15 minutes. Using the low heat at first will ensure that the chicken gets throughly cooked without getting burnt. Turning up the heat at the last step will ensure a delicious crisp on the outside!

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